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Governor General of Canada / Gouverneur général du Canadaa
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Heraldry

 

The Officers and Heralds of Arms and
their Armorial Bearings


Introduction

In keeping with ancient traditions, the Authority and its officers have been assigned arms or badges to identify the institution and the positions within it. Because one of the principal purposes of heraldry is to identify and to distinguish one bearer of arms from another, a second tradition is also observed, in which the particular incumbent of a senior position is signalled by a display of personal arms joined to arms of office. This is known as marshalling. The senior officers of the Canadian Heraldic Authority also place their arms of office on two crossed batons of office.

The Vice-Regal Warrant of 1994 assigned the arms, batons and badges of office of the Herald Chancellor, Deputy Herald Chancellor, Chief Herald of Canada, and Athabaska, Saint-Laurent and Fraser Heralds. Subsequent Vice-Regal Warrants assigned badges of office to Saguenay, Assiniboine, Miramichi, and Coppermine Heralds, Outaouais and Rideau Heralds Emeritus, and Dauphin, Niagara, Cowichan, Albion, Capilano and Rouge Heralds Extraordinary.

Herald Chancellor

The position of Herald Chancellor is held by the Secretary to the Governor General, who is responsible for the administration of the entire vice-regal office. The Herald Chancellor or the Deputy Herald Chancellor issues the warrants permitting the Chief Herald to make grants or registrations of arms. They also sign each completed grant or registration document along with the Chief Herald.

The red shield features a gold maple tree with its roots visible. As well as being a national emblem, the maple tree represents the predominant species on the grounds of Rideau Hall, the official site of the Authority. The batons of office use the colours of the arms, and are decorated with shields of the arms of the Authority. The arms illustrated here are marshalled on the right with the personal arms of the Herald Chancellor.

Herald Chancellor

Sheila-Marie Cook
(2006- )
Léopold Amyot
(1988-1990)
Judith Ann Larocque
C.V.O.
(1990-2000)
Barbara Uteck
C.V.O.
(2000-2006)

Deputy Herald Chancellor

The position of Deputy Herald Chancellor is held by the Deputy Secretary to the Governor General, who is also the head of the Chancellery of Honours, responsible for the administration of the Canadian honours system.

The strong links and similarity of duties between this office and that of the Herald Chancellor are emphasized in these arms. The main elements of the design of the arms and batons of office remain the same, with the addition of the border to the arms and the change of the colours from gold to white to distinguish them. The arms illustrated here are marshalled with the personal arms of the Deputy Herald Chancellor.

Deputy Herald Chancellor

Emmanuelle Sajous
(2005- )
LGen François Richard, C.M.M.
(1988-1992)
LGen James C. Gervais, C.M.M.
(1993-2004)

Chief Herald of Canada

The Chief Herald of Canada directs the operations of the Canadian Heraldic Authority and makes the grants of arms (with the exception of certain grants made directly by the Governor General).

The colours of these arms are the official colours of Canada, red and white. In the centre is a small shield, emblematic of heraldry itself, bearing a maple leaf. Because the office of Chief Herald is a counterpart to the Kings of Arms in the Crown's older heraldic authorities, the inner shield is ensigned with a white maple leaf coronet, the rim of which is set with red jewels. The batons of office feature these same arms and a decorative band of blue, representing the great rivers of Canada, charged with white maple leaves.

Chief Herald of Canada
Claire Boudreau
(2007- )
Robert D. Watt
(1988-2007)

Deputy Chief Herald of Canada

The Deputy Chief Herald seconds the Chief Herald of Canada with the direction of the operations of the Canadian Heraldic Authority.

Deputy Chief Herald of Canada
Image
Claire Boudreau
(2005-2007)

Heralds of Arms

Heralds are part of the Public Service of Canada and work full-time at the Canadian Heraldic Authority.

The heralds of arms, responsible to the Chief Herald, are each assigned a badge of office. The heralds' titles are taken from the names of significant Canadian rivers. Following the tradition of older heraldic authorities, heralds' titles are territorial designations, although it should be noted that the heralds serve the entire country and are not limited to the region of their title.

Saint-Laurent Herald
Bruce Patterson (2008- )
Saint-Laurent Herald is the Registrar of the Authority, responsible for its records, especially the Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada.

The gridiron symbol of the martyrdom of St. Lawrence, the namesake of Eastern Canada's greatest and most historic river, is shown enflamed beneath a blue cross, the ends of which terminate in fleurs-de-lis, symbol of Royal France, New France and Quebec.

Athabaska Herald
Charles Maier (1988-2001)
The Wild Rose, floral emblem of the province of Alberta, is placed over two traditional Athapascan copper knives, honouring this native linguistic group and the great river and region of Northwestern Canada, which share various spellings of this name. This title is currently not in use.

Fraser Herald
Cathy Bursey-Sabourin (1989- )
Fraser Herald is the Principal Artist of the Authority, responsible for overseeing the artwork created for the grants of arms.

The badge combines symbolism of the sun and water, indicating that the Fraser River is the most important river in British Columbia, which features a sun on its provincial arms. Traditionally, water is depicted in heraldry by white and blue wavy stripes, and the substitution here of gold for white makes a reference to the gold deposits in the Fraser River, which led to the Cariboo gold rush. At the centre of the badge is a cinquefoil, a stylized heraldic flower of five petals. As this is a feature of coats of arms within the Scottish Clan Fraser, it pays tribute to the river's namesake, the explorer Simon Fraser.

Saguenay Herald
Forrest Pass (2009- )
Saguenay Herald is the Assistant Registrar of the Authority, and, as such, assists Saint-Laurent Herald. Together they also have specific responsibilities for the bilingual texts of the grant and registration documents.

The badge represents, in a stylized form, a blueberry, with its heart composed of four small crowns. Blueberries are a famous feature of the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region, the inhabitants of which are affectionately known as "Bleuets." The four crowns in cross make reference to the "Kingdom" myth of the Saguenay region from the time of Jacques Cartier and Roberval.

Assiniboine Herald
Darrel Kennedy (2002- )
The design is based on the meaning of the word "Assiniboine," an Ojibway term describing the practice of boiling food by dropping heated rocks into water. The black circle represents the rim of a pot, looking from the top down. The red illustrates the heat from the rocks in the pot.

Miramichi Herald
Manon Labelle (2009- )
The Mi’kmaq star refers to the name Miramichi, which means “Land of the Mi’kmaq”, and honours the first inhabitants of New Brunswick. The white (north), yellow (east), red (south) and black (west) signify the four sacred directions and human races. The double lines around the star produce the adapted design for use by Miramichi Herald and also recall the porcupine quill decoration used by the Mi’kmaq Nation.

Coppermine Herald
Catherine Fitzpatrick (2003- )
Coppermine Herald is the Assistant Artist of the Canadian Heraldic Authority.

The ulu is a traditional Inuit knife that has existed for over 4000 years. It honours the northern people and land. Its copper colour refers to the title Coppermine Herald.

Heralds Emeritus

The honorary position of Herald Emeritus is one to which a retired herald may be appointed in recognition of particular notable service to heraldry. On occasion, a Herald Emeritus can perform duties on behalf of the Canadian Heraldic Authority.

Outaouais Herald Emeritus
Auguste Vachon (2000- )
The green disc evokes the natural setting of the Outaouais region, and the three white shields with their bases pointing to the centre are significant in several ways. From a historical point of view, they refer to the tradition the Outaouais (a tribe of the Algonquin family) shared with the Ojibway and the Potawatomi that at one time these three groups had formed a single tribe. From a geographical point of view, they refer to the Ottawa River and the two other rivers of the National Capital Region (the Rideau River and the Gatineau River), which were the primary routes used by early explorers of this region. Finally, they represent in a general way the three great divisions of time: the past, the present, and the future.

Rideau Herald Emeritus
Robert D. Watt (2007- )
Gold and blue are the official colours of Rideau Hall. The vertical stripes evoke a waterfall or a curtain, and illustrate the origin of the name “Rideau” (curtain), which is the name the first French explorers in the 17th century gave to the falls at the mouth of the Rideau River.

Heralds Extraordinary

Like Heralds Emeritus, Heralds Extraordinary are honorary positions held by individuals who have made particularly notable contributions to Canadian heraldry. On occasion, they can perform duties on behalf of the Canadian Heraldic Authority.

Dauphin Herald Extraordinary
Robert Pichette (1995- )
The two main components of the badge are a blue heraldic dolphin displayed on a stylization of a Mi'kmaq trade silver brooch of the type made for fur traders in the 17th and 18th centuries and traded to many of the First Nations. The badge is outlined with a wavy band of blue, referring both to the waters of the Rivière Dauphin (the former name of the Annapolis River) and more widely to the seas, lakes and rivers of Atlantic Canada.

Niagara Herald Extraordinary
Gordon Macpherson (1999- )
The badge is placed on a red compass rose of sixteen points. As a compass shows direction, it indicates nationwide or even international outreach. It can refer to the Niagara River itself and its location at the centre of the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence River transportation system. Also, it indicates the national and international reach of heraldry. At the centre of the badge are three wavy stripes that indicate flowing water. As they are shown vertically, they make a reference not only to the south-to-north direction of the Niagara River, but also to its most famous feature, the Niagara Falls.

Cowichan Herald Extraordinary
Graham Anderson (1999- )
The design is based on the word "Cowichan," which means "place warmed by the sun." The two animals in the centre, depicted in the Salish style, are based on a design by Cowichan artist Wayne Charlie. They are a horned dog, Wagaas, and an eagle, Yuhwala, two of the most important creatures from traditional Cowichan teachings.

Albion Herald Extraordinary
D. Ralph Spence (2006- )
Red, white and blue are the colours of the Royal Union Flag and represent the Loyalist founders of the Hamilton region, the location of the Albion Falls at Red Hill Creek. Albion is an ancient name for Great Britain. The broken stripes in the centre of the badge symbolize the water of Albion Falls flowing over the Niagara Escarpment.

Capilano Herald Extraordinary
Helen K. Mussalem (2006- )
The salmon represent new life and their position refers to the idea of the circle of life. The Coast Salish artistic style used to depict the salmon pays tribute to the fact that the name Capilano is derived from a word in Halkomelem, a Coast Salish language. The rope around the badge refers to the famous suspension bridge spanning the Capilano Canyon, which lies between North and West Vancouver. The points of the diamond shape symbolize the four sacred directions for the First Nations, the horizontal directions of life and the vertical directions of the spirit.

Rouge Herald Extraordinary
Roger A. Lindsay (2006- )
The fleurs-de-lis and the red colour allude to the Rouge River in the eastern part of the City of Toronto, a river named by French explorers in reference to red clay. The space at the centre of the badge resembles a white rose, a symbol of York, the original name of Toronto.

Heralds, Heralds Emeritus, and Heralds Extraordinary

Saint-Laurent Herald
Bruce Patterson
(2008- )
Claire Boudreau
(2000-2007)
Auguste Vachon
(1988-2000)
Fraser Herald
Cathy Bursey-Sabourin
(1989- )
Athabaska Herald
Charles Maier
(1988-2001)
Saguenay Herald
Forrest Pass
(2009- )
Karine Constantineau
(2008-2009)
Bruce Patterson
(2000-2008)
Claire Boudreau
(1997-2000)

Assiniboine Herald
Darrel Kennedy
(2000-2001)

(2002- )

Miramichi Herald
Manon Labelle
(2009- )
Karine Constantineau
(2003-2008)
Image
Coppermine Herald
Catherine Fitzpatrick
(2003- )
Outaouais Herald
Emeritus

Auguste Vachon
(2000- )
Hull, Quebec
Rideau Herald Emeritus
Robert D. Watt
(2007- )
North Vancouver,
British Columbia
Dauphin Herald
Extraordinary

Robert Pichette
(1995- )
Moncton, New Brunswick
Niagara Herald
Extraordinary

Gordon Macpherson
(1999- )
Burlington, Ontario
Cowichan Herald
Extraordinary

Graham Anderson
(1999- )
Cowichan Bay, British Columbia
Image
Image
Image
Albion Herald Extraordinary
D. Ralph Spence
(2006- )
Hamilton, Ontario
Capilano Herald Extraordinary
Helen K. Mussalem
(2006- )
Vancouver,
British Columbia
Rouge Herald Extraordinary
Roger A. Lindsay
(2006- )
Toronto, Ontario
Updated: 2018-03-26
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