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Governor General of Canada / Gouverneur général du Canadaa

 


Media

 

100th Investiture of the Order of Canada

October 18, 2007

OTTAWA—Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Governor General of Canada, will preside over an investiture ceremony at Rideau Hall, on Friday October 26, 2007, at 10:30 a.m.

The Order of Canada, our country’s highest civilian honour, was awarded for the first time in 1967. Over the years, more than 5 000 people have been invested into the Order of Canada. This ceremony is the 100th investiture of the Order of Canada.

The Governor General, who is Chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order, will bestow the honour on 12 officers and 28 members.

-30-

A media schedule for the investiture ceremony (Annex A), a complete list of recipients (Annex B) and a backgrounder (Annex C) are attached. Media interested in covering this event and interviewing recipients are asked to contact the Rideau Hall Press Office.

Honours and Recipients Information
Marie-Paule Thorn

Rideau Hall Press Office
(613) 993-2569 or
1 800 465-6890

Media Information (Ceremony)
Marie-Eve Létourneau

Rideau Hall Press Office
613-998-0287
Isabelle Serrurier
Rideau Hall Press Office
613-998-7280

www.gg.ca / www.citizenvoices.gg.ca/en/
 
ANNEX A- SCHEDULE
Members of the media are asked to observe the following schedule:

10:00 a.m.  Media arrive at Rideau Hall
10:30 a.m.  Ceremony begins
Entrance of Their Excellencies
The Governor General speaks
The Governor General presents the insignia (Members first, followed by Officers)
Noon  Media interviews with recipients

ANNEX B- RECIPIENTS

MEMBERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

Marjorie Bencz, C.M.

Edmonton, Alta.

Catherine A. (Kiki) Delaney, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Michel Donato, C.M.

Outremont, Que.

Howard Engel, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Paul Fazio, C.M.

Pointe-Claire, Que.

Michael Gardener, C.M.

Iqaluit, Nun.

Helen E. Gardiner, C.M.

Caledon East, Ont.

Roland Gauvin, C.M.

Moncton, N.B.

Patsy George, C.M., O.B.C.

Vancouver, B.C.

Lois Hollstedt, C.M.

North Vancouver, B.C.

Erast R. Huculak, C.M.

Etobicoke, Ont.

Frances Itani, C.M.

Ottawa, Ont.

Alex S. Janvier, C.M.

Cold Lake, Alta.

Connie Kaldor, C.M.

Greenfield Park, Que. and Regina, Sask.

Harry Lehotsky, C.M. (deceased)

Winnipeg, Man.

Rémi Marcoux, C.M.

Outremont, Que.

Austin A. Mardon, C.M.

Edmonton, Alta.

Eric H. Molson, C.M.

Westmount, Que.

Geraldine Nakonechny, C.M.

Edmonton, Alta.

Carol Newell, C.M.

Vancouver, B.C.

Daniel O’Brien, C.M., O.N.B.

Chester Basin, N.S. and Fredericton, N.B.

Patrick O’Flaherty, C.M.

St. John’s, N.L.

J. Norgrove Penny, C.M.

Victoria, B.C.

Robert L. Pierce, C.M.

Calgary, Alta.

Valerie Pringle, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Gérard Snow, C.M.

Moncton, N.B.

Joan Stebbins, C.M.

Lethbridge, Alta.

Setsuko Thurlow, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

OFFICERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

Peter Desbarats, O.C.

London, Ont.

Louis Fortier, O.C.

Quebec, Que.

James A. Gosling, O.C.

Redwood City, California. U.S.A and Calgary, Alta.

Antoine M. Hakim, O.C.

Ottawa, Ont.

Bryan L. Harvey, O.C., S.O.M.

Saskatoon, Sask.

Hector J. Jacques, O.C.

Dartmouth, N.S.

Cyril Max Kay, O.C.
This is a promotion within the Order.

Edmonton, Alta.

Robert Louie, O.C.

Kelowna, B.C.

William H. New, O.C.

Vancouver, B.C.

Francis A. Plummer, O.C.

Winnipeg, Man.

Dennis C. Smith, O.C.

Collingwood, Ont.

E. Douglas Wigle, O.C.

Toronto, Ont.


CITATIONS

MEMBERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

Marjorie Bencz, C.M.
Edmonton, Alberta

A strong voice for the poor and working poor, Marjorie Bencz has been fighting hunger in Canada for the past two decades. Executive director of the Edmonton Gleaners Association Food Bank since 1989 and past chair of the Canadian Association of Food Banks’ board of directors, she battles complacency and apathy with action. Adept at gathering community support, she has led a relentless campaign to safeguard the right of all Canadians to maintain their sense of dignity regardless of their socio-economic situation.

Catherine A. (Kiki) Delaney, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Kiki Delaney serves as a model for women in business. After a steady rise through major investment houses, she launched her own investment counselling firm, one of the first women in Canada to do so. A dedicated philanthropist and passionate volunteer, she is known for her vision and generosity. She is an advocate for culture and the arts, and helps to change lives for the better through her work on women's issues and on other causes that are close to her heart.

Michel Donato, C.M.
Outremont, Quebec

Respected by his peers and admired by jazz lovers, Michel Donato is a world-class bass player. His technique, virtuosity and mastery have gained him a reputation that extends well beyond our borders. He has been a member of a variety of music groups and has played with Quebec jazz and vocal greats. He has written pieces for bass as well as music for television and film. He has also made a number of albums, several recorded with other world-renowned artists. Moreover, this incredible musician is imparting his knowledge to the next generation by teaching at Université de Montréal and McGill University.

Howard Engel, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Howard Engel has played an instrumental role in the revival of the crime fiction genre in Canadian literature. He broke new ground as the author of the Benny Cooperman mystery series featuring heroes, villains and locations that are unequivocally Canadian. With his tales of a private investigator based in small-town Ontario, he has given readers across the nation and around the world a sense of our stories, our values and our various regional characteristics. As a distinguished visitor at the University of Toronto and a founding member of the Crime Writers of Canada, he has also fostered the development of students and fellow authors.

Paul Fazio, C.M.
Pointe-Claire, Quebec

Paul Fazio is a civil engineer who established building engineering as an academic field in Canada. Founder of the Centre for Building Studies and professor at Concordia University, he led the Centre for more than two decades, solidifying its reputation as an institute offering unique teaching and research programs. Recognizing the need to transfer new technology and innovation techniques to design and construction stakeholders, he founded the Société d'informatique et de recherche pour l'industrie de la construction (SIRICON) and the Quebec Building Envelope Council. In addition, he has served on various boards and councils of government and industry organizations over the years.

Michael Gardener, C.M.
Iqaluit, Nunavut

Arriving in the North as a missionary in the 1950s, Michael Gardener travelled by dogsled and lived on the land with Inuit people, learning their language, customs and history. Thus began a lifelong commitment to the people of Northern communities. He started the first class for Inuit children in one of the areas he served. In another, he organized an Anglican theological college, which became the foundation for the growth of First Nations ministry in the North. In Iqaluit, he has mobilized community action on a number of challenging social issues. He also served with the city's Adult Justice Committee and the Northwest Territories elders society. Currently retired, he continues to provide comfort and pastoral care to seniors, bereaved families and families in crisis.

Helen E. Gardiner, C.M.
Caledon East, Ontario

For decades, our artistic and cultural communities have benefited from the commitment and generosity of Helen Gardiner. In 1984, she co-founded Toronto's Gardiner Museum, which has since grown into one of the foremost museums of ceramic art in North America. As chair of the Museum's expansion drive, she led the successful fundraising campaign for the construction of new galleries, education studios and research facilities. Her philanthropy has also benefited the Textile Museum of Canada, the Soulpepper Theatre and the National Ballet of Canada, where she has reached out on a personal level to encourage and support young dancers.

Roland Gauvin, C.M.
Moncton, New Brunswick

Through his music, activist folk songs and service to the community, Roland Gauvin tirelessly promotes a proud and vibrant Acadia. Singer-songwriter-composer and renowned musician, he established a variety of groups, such as Roland et Johnny, Les Méchants Maquereaux, and the legendary 1755, which created a new style that influenced generations of musicians. He has made a number of albums and has performed on national and international stages. He is also a mentor to many young artists. He is known as "Monsieur de l'Acadie" because of the school workshops he voluntarily developed and teaches on Acadian and Francophone culture. In addition, he donates his time and talent to a number of charitable organizations.

Patsy George, C.M., O.B.C.
Vancouver, British Columbia

Patsy George is a prominent advocate for human rights and social justice. A social worker, she served in many roles, including those of director of Multiculturalism BC and advisor on community development for the province. Empowering communities has always been important to her, and she has been an advocate for immigrant women, visible minorities, children and First Nations people. She has demonstrated her leadership qualities and dedication through her work on behalf of a variety of social organizations, including the Boys and Girls Club of British Columbia and Parents Together. Committed to fostering a more equitable world, she is a director of the Stephen Lewis Foundation and the president of the Vancouver branch of the United Nations Association in Canada.

Lois Hollstedt, C.M.
North Vancouver, British Columbia

Over the last four decades, Lois Hollstedt has dedicated herself to improving the lives of women and children. Founding president of the YWCA of Kamloops, and later CEO of the YWCA in Vancouver, she played a leading role in the establishment of daycare centres, art programs and residences for single mothers, as well as a home for battered women and their children. Other initiatives that she has championed include research on fetal alcohol syndrome and an employment program to help disadvantaged women move from social assistance to the workforce.

Erast R. Huculak, C.M.
Etobicoke, Ontario

In the spirit of sharing his good fortune, Erast Huculak develops the best qualities in others through encouragement and example. A pharmacist, he built his company from a single dispensary into one of the largest suppliers of pharmaceuticals to long-term care facilities across Canada. He endowed a chair in Ukrainian-Canadian studies at the University of Alberta and is a founder of the Children of Chornobyl Canadian Fund. Deeply involved in helping his homeland of Ukraine make the peaceful transition to democracy, he was recruited by the Ukrainian president to serve as a personal advisor.

Frances Itani, C.M.
Ottawa, Ontario

In the early 1970s, while juggling the demands of a young family, Frances Itani enrolled in evening courses at the University of Alberta, where she began to explore and develop her creative writing abilities. After earning her master's degree, she held several teaching and writer-in-residence positions, travelling extensively in Canada and abroad. Her emergence as a literary force was confirmed with Leaning, Leaning Over Water, a resounding commercial success. Her most popular work to date, Deafening, garnered numerous and prestigious international accolades. A generous mentor to aspiring writers, she is also a quiet benefactor of the Ottawa Youth Orchestra and a dedicated volunteer with the Ottawa Deaf Centre and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario.

Alex S. Janvier, C.M.
Cold Lake, Alberta

Alex Janvier is a visual artist whose body of work is a powerful celebration of his Indigenous roots.  He complements his use of mixed media, oil, acrylic, watercolour and gouache, featured in his abstract art, with traditional Dene materials like beads and quills. The great tour de force of his career is a 450-square-metre mural, entitled Morning Star, which graces the domed ceiling of the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Also very involved as a spokesperson for the Cold Lake First Nations community, he serves as a beacon for others, encouraging the development of Canada's next generation of artists.

Connie Kaldor, C.M.
Greenfield Park, Quebec and Regina, Saskatchewan

Connie Kaldor is considered one of our finest songwriters and an icon of the Canadian folk scene. Transforming aspects of everyday life into insightful, compelling songs, she explores the range of human experience with wit and humour. A proud western Canadian, she has been an important cultural ambassador, touring extensively throughout North America, as well as in India, China and Europe. She is also an entrepreneur who runs her own company and who has successfully ventured into albums and books for children. Revered by fans and fellow musicians, she continues to inspire and entertain.

Harry Lehotsky, C.M. (deceased)
Winnipeg, Manitoba

More than 20 years ago, Harry Lehotsky moved his family to Winnipeg's West End and embarked on a journey to help revitalize this marginalized community. As founder and senior pastor of New Life Ministries, he put his faith into action. He founded Lazarus Housing, which renovates abandoned houses for resale to middle- and low-income families. He also established the Ellice Street Café and Theatre to provide employment for local residents as well as to build civic pride and spirit. Renowned for his conviction, determination and courage, he remains an inspiration and a model for other activists who champion community development and healthy neighbourhoods.

Rémi Marcoux, C.M.
Outremont, Quebec

Rémi Marcoux is the perfect example of those builders who contribute to the vitality of the economic sector and the growth of communities. In 1976, he bought a little printing shop with about 30 employees. With talent, determination and innovation, he has made Transcontinental a flagship of the Canadian economy in the field of printing and publishing. The company is also known as one of the most socially responsible in Canada. He is respected and admired for his generosity and ongoing commitment to a number of organizations, such as the Sainte-Justine Hospital Foundation, the International Center for Conflict Resolution and Mediation, the United Way and HEC Montréal.

Austin A. Mardon, C.M.
Edmonton, Alberta

Austin Mardon never hesitates to use his personal story as an example to others living with mental illness. In 1992, he was diagnosed with schizophrenia. Undaunted, he channeled his energies into writing and scientific research. It was at this time that he also became active as a mental health advocate, speaking out about issues affecting people who live with mental illness. Stressing the benefits and the importance of medication as a way to regain control over one's life, he has helped a great number of individuals to reclaim their place in society. Over the years, he has become not only a spokesperson, but also a champion who serves as a mentor and a beacon of hope for thousands of other Canadians.

Eric H. Molson, C.M.
Westmount, Quebec

Chair of the board of Molson Coors Brewing Company, Eric Molson is well known for his voluntarism and philanthropy. This corporate leader continues to uphold the Molson Foundation's tradition of giving back to the community. Over the years, he has personally supported numerous organizations, sharing with them his business acumen and financial resources. He has been serving in leadership roles with the Montreal General Hospital Corporation and Foundation since 1962, and was chancellor of Concordia University from 1993 to 2005. The Canadian Irish Studies Foundation and Vie des Arts magazine have also benefited from his dedication.

Geraldine Nakonechny, C.M.
Edmonton, Alberta

Geraldine Nakonechny has made important contributions to nursing. Since devising one of the first e-learning systems in Canada for occupational health and gerontology nursing courses, she has set up similar programs in Australia and Ukraine. She has also developed international student exchange programs and led a Canada-Russia joint program to establish regulatory networks and enhance the role of nurses. Through her ability to foster the sharing of knowledge, methods and practices, she has greatly influenced the quality of nursing education worldwide.

Carol Newell, C.M.
Vancouver, British Columbia

Carol Newell's generosity is extraordinary and inspiring. At 21, she received a vast inheritance and decided to keep only a modest portion for herself, vowing to give the rest away during her lifetime. Philanthropy has become a full-time job since the creation of the Endswell Foundation and the establishment of the Renewal Partners Company, which provides venture capital to socially responsible and environmentally sustainable companies. For years, she carried out these activities anonymously but then decided to go public, launching a campaign to convince others to give. A formidable role model, she encourages others to share both their wealth and vision for a better world.

Daniel O’Brien, C.M., O.N.B.
Chester Basin, Nova Scotia and Fredericton, New Brunswick

A man of ingenuity and determination, Daniel O'Brien was the driving force behind the transformation and revitalization of St. Thomas University. As president, he implemented a strategic growth plan that added new academic programs, expanded campus infrastructure and doubled student enrolment. Highly valued for his commitment to co-operation, he has earned the respect of students, faculty, alumni and staff. Also an engaged advocate for community economic growth, he has shared his knowledge and networks with Team Fredericton, the Greater Fredericton Economic Development Corporation and the Beaverbrook Art Gallery.

Patrick O’Flaherty, C.M.
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

As a scholar, historian and novelist, Patrick O'Flaherty has been an important contributor to the heritage and culture of his province. Professor emeritus of English at Memorial University of Newfoundland, he introduced courses on Newfoundland literature and was co-founder and editor of the journal Newfoundland and Labrador Studies. His books and articles on political history have been passionate and compelling additions to the study of the island and its pre-Confederation history. A respected promoter of the arts, he has also shared his broad knowledge as a consultant, newspaper columnist and public speaker.

J. Norgrove Penny, C.M.
Victoria, British Columbia

A pediatric orthopedic surgeon and high-profile sports medicine specialist, Norgrove Penny has helped change the lives of countless children with disabilities. After leaving a thriving practice, he set up the first orthopedic rehabilitation program in Uganda. He created a 50-bed rehabilitation unit and provided free surgery to children suffering from the effects of polio, club foot, bone infections and severe burns. He also trained other doctors, and created community-based rehabilitation centres and surgical satellites. The model has been replicated throughout the developing world. Now back in Canada, he continues to help the World Health Organization and other agencies prevent childhood disabilities in developing nations.

Robert L. Pierce, C.M.
Calgary, Alberta

Through his multi-faceted career in the Canadian petrochemical industry, Robert Pierce has fostered its evolution and growth. Following a successful career as a lawyer in Saskatchewan, he moved to Calgary in 1973, where he held senior executive positions with Nova Corporation and other major companies. Among his accomplishments, he helped to establish Western Canada's first world scale ethylene plant and to expand the export market for Alberta's natural gas. Later, he led the international team that built the first natural gas pipeline to cross the Andes Mountains. He has also provided leadership to the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology and the Calgary Military Museum Society.

Valerie Pringle, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Valerie Pringle has consistently displayed versatility and the ability to connect with viewers, making her one of this country's most beloved journalists. Since beginning her career in the early 1970s as a reporter with CFRB Toronto, she has chronicled many of the landmark events of our times. She has hosted or produced a number of popular television programs for several major networks. Giving freely of her time, she also volunteers with the Trans Canada Trail Foundation, the Ontario Special Olympics and the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, among others. In addition, she is a generous benefactor of organizations and aspiring journalists.

Gérard Snow, C.M.
Moncton, New Brunswick

Gérard Snow's contribution to the integration of the French language in the practice of common law in New Brunswick and elsewhere in Canada is immeasurable. This jurilinguist is the founding director and the backbone of the Centre de traduction et de terminologie juridiques (CTTJ) at the Université de Moncton. Under his leadership, the CTTJ oversaw the translation of laws and regulations of many provincial and territorial jurisdictions, as well as the case law of the New Brunswick courts. He has written legal articles and books and is the co-author of the JURITERM software, a bilingual common law terminology bank. Throughout his career, he has also been active in a number of associations, including the Corporation of Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters of New Brunswick.

Joan Stebbins, C.M.
Lethbridge, Alberta

Joan Stebbins has established the Southern Alberta Art Gallery as one of Canada's leading contemporary art institutions. Now curator, she joined the Gallery's ranks in 1979, and has since nurtured its growth in a variety of roles. She has sought out emerging, often cutting-edge artists and curated exhibitions of their work. For the past three decades, she has had a catalytic effect, generating interest in, and acceptance of, contemporary art in a generally traditional cultural environment. Artists and the community at large have benefited from her commitment to the creation of an environment that fosters accessible art.

Setsuko Thurlow, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

As a 13-year old schoolgirl, Setsuko Thurlow found herself in close proximity to the hypocentre of the atomic blast that rocked Hiroshima. A survivor of one of the most pivotal events in modern history, she displayed great courage and leadership, sharing her experiences in order to sensitize us to the consequences of armed conflict on civilian populations and to promote lasting peace. After relocating to Toronto, she joined forces with the mayors of Toronto, Hiroshima and Nagasaki to establish the Peace Garden in Nathan Phillips Square. Over the years, she has served with a number of organizations, including Voices of Women, the Canadian Council of Churches and the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, continuing her journey from victim to activist.

OFFICERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

Peter Desbarats, O.C.
London, Ontario

For more than 50 years, Peter Desbarats has been a leading figure in Canadian journalism. In both print and broadcast media, he has reported extensively on the political affairs of our nation. Former dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of Western Ontario, he has developed standards of practice in his field and is often consulted on media ethics. He is also an author, having written non-fiction books, including an early biography of Quebec Premier René Lévesque, plays and children's books. As well, he has actively supported the Canadian Journalism Foundation, the Canadian Civil Liberties Association and the London Arts Council.

Louis Fortier, O.C.
Quebec, Quebec

Louis Fortier has helped place Canada at the forefront of research on the impacts of climate change in the Arctic. A professor at Université Laval, he is a tireless promoter of international multidisciplinary co-operation. He has created and managed mega-research programs in marine science, such as the International North Water Polynya Study and the Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study. He is also responsible for the CCGS Amundsen, a Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker refitted as a state-of-the-art research platform. As well, ArcticNet, the first network of centres of excellence focused on the Arctic, was created under his leadership. The network, of which he is the scientific director, studies the impact of climate change in the Canadian Arctic.

James A. Gosling, O.C.
Redwood City, California and Calgary, Alberta

As one of Canada's most prominent software developers, James Gosling has made significant contributions to the computing landscape. At the age of 15, he was writing software programs for the Department of Physics at the University of Calgary. Later, as a doctoral student, he developed Emacs, a text editor for Unix systems. Currently chief technology officer at Sun Microsystems, as well as vice-president and Sun fellow, he is best known as the father of Java programming language, the most widely used software in technology. True to his roots, he has provided leadership to Alberta's Information and Communications Technology Research Advisory Council and to the Informatics Circle of Research Excellence.

Antoine M. Hakim, O.C.
Ottawa, Ontario

Professor and chair of neurology at the University of Ottawa, Antoine Hakim has worked tirelessly to increase public and scientific awareness of cerebrovascular disease. He is an internationally respected scientist whose research has influenced treatment strategies for stroke victims. Also known for his vision and leadership, he has been the catalyst for the development of the Canadian Stroke Network, the Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, and the Ottawa Stroke Consortium for Applied Research. By creating synergies and linkages among stakeholders, he has promoted research and training, and has helped establish Canada's reputation as a leader in the field.

Bryan L. Harvey, O.C., S.O.M.
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Bryan Harvey is a world-renowned plant breeder who has greatly contributed to the Canadian agricultural economy. Professor Emeritus at the University of Saskatchewan, he has developed or co-developed more than 50 varieties of barley. His Harrington cultivar, known for its superior field performance and brewing quality, was the most successful and widely grown in Western Canada. Also known for his academic and administrative leadership, he was instrumental in establishing the University's Crop Development Centre as a leader in plant breeding. Over the years, he has been widely sought after for his expertise and has been an advisor and leader to many national and international committees and boards.

Hector J. Jacques, O.C.
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia

In 1972, Hector Jacques co-founded Jacques Whitford, an environmental consulting firm that has since become a world leader in earth sciences engineering. Now chair of Jacques Whitford, he is a visionary entrepreneur who has built a reputation for excellence, notably in environmental impact assessments and geotechnical engineering. A champion of economic development in Atlantic Canada, he has nurtured young engineers and business leaders by establishing a mentoring program at his firm. Also active in his community, he has served as a director on the Nova Scotia Voluntary Planning Board and on the Black Business Initiative Board.

Cyril Max Kay, O.C.
Edmonton, Alberta

A pre-eminent biochemist, Cyril Kay is an internationally acknowledged specialist in the structure and function of proteins. He has played a crucial role in fostering collaboration among protein chemists and in strengthening this area of research in his role as chair of the International Research Advisory Committee of PENCE (the Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence). Admired for his sound judgment and critical analysis skills, he has also been sought out to help shape the direction of health research in his province. He is currently vice-president of research for the Alberta Cancer Board, where he is developing a new comprehensive cancer research institute.

This is a promotion within the Order.

Robert Louie, O.C.
Kelowna, British Columbia

For more than 20 years, Robert Louie has dedicated himself to improving the social and economic well-being of his community and of Canada's other First Nations communities. After receiving his law degree from the University of Victoria, he became involved in Aboriginal self-governance. Twice elected chief of the Westbank First Nation, he worked industriously to foster opportunities for growth, development and self-government. His perseverance and determination during lengthy negotiations with the federal government contributed to the signing of the historic Westbank Self-Government Agreement, which granted jurisdiction over land management, language and culture.

William H. New, O.C.
Vancouver, British Columbia

One of our most influential literary critics and scholars, William New has devoted over four decades to the study and promotion of Canadian literature. A former Killam professor at the University of British Columbia, he has taught and lectured around the world. He has written and edited over 30 books, including his own works of poetry. He also edited the respected journal Canadian Literature for nearly 20 years. He has served on dozens of juries, including that of the prestigious Giller Prize. Recognized with numerous honours, he was awarded the Royal Society of Canada's Lorne Pierce Medal for unprecedented achievement in critical and imaginative literature.

Francis A. Plummer, O.C.
Winnipeg, Manitoba

Francis Plummer is a recognized specialist in infectious diseases whose work has influenced public health policy in Canada and abroad. A professor at the University of Manitoba, he has advanced our knowledge of HIV/AIDS. As scientific director general at the National Microbiology Laboratory, he has positioned it as a world-renowned centre for the diagnosis of and research on dangerous microbial diseases, notably SARS and the West Nile virus. A consultant for international organizations and governments of countries such as Kenya and India, he has developed low-cost educational and practical interventions that have been adopted by the World Health Organization and by UNAIDS, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS.

Dennis C. Smith, O.C.
Collingwood, Ontario

Dennis Smith is a chemist who is recognized worldwide for his contributions to biomaterials science and education. He began his career in England, where he developed specialized cements used in restorative dentistry and in the first orthopedic hip replacements. At the University of Toronto, which he joined in 1969, he played an instrumental role in developing one of Canada's truly international research programs in biomaterials. He also contributed to the scientific and academic advancement of this discipline by co-founding the Canadian Biomaterials Society and by serving on national and international committees. Professor emeritus at the university's Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, he remains actively engaged in research.

E. Douglas Wigle, O.C.
Toronto, Ontario

An internationally respected cardiologist, teacher and scientist, Douglas Wigle has greatly contributed to our understanding of heart disease. Because of his work, we now know that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a thickening of the heart's muscle tissue), once thought to be a rarity, affects one in 500 Canadians. Responsible for the development of a major clinical cardiac centre at Toronto's General Hospital, he has trained scores of specialists in Canada. He has also toured China on a number of occasions, influencing some of that country's most promising medical students. Through his intensive and meticulous research, he has greatly improved the medical and surgical treatment options used to correct obstructions to the heart.

ANNEX C- ORDER OF CANADA BACKGROUNDER


  • The Order of Canada was established in 1967 to recognize outstanding achievement and service in various fields of human endeavour. It is our country's highest honour for lifetime achievement.
    Three different levels of membership—Companion, Officer and Member—honour people whose accomplishments vary in degree and scope.
    Appointments are made on the recommendation of an advisory council, chaired by the Chief Justice of Canada. The Governor General is the Chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order.
    Membership in the Advisory Council reflects the diversity and excellence in Canadian society. Certain Advisory Council members are appointed by virtue of their office; others are appointed to the Council for a fixed term to achieve a balanced representation of the various regions of the country. The current members of the Council are: 
  • The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, P.C., Chief Justice of Canada  (Chair)
  • Dr. Patricia A. Baird, O.C., O.B.C.
  • Dr. Patricia A. Demers, President, the Royal Society of Canada: The Academies of Arts, Humanities and Sciences of Canada
  • Mr. Tom Jackson, O.C.
  • Ms. Karen Kain, C.C., Chair, Canada Council for the Arts
  • Ms. Judith A. LaRocque, C.V.O., Deputy Minister, Canadian Heritage
  • Dr. Daurene E. Lewis, C.M.
  • Mr. Kevin Lynch, Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet
  • Mr. L. Jacques Ménard, O.C. 
  • Mr. J.E. (Ted) Newall, O.C.
  • Ms. Bonnie M. Patterson, Chairman of the Board, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada

Any group or individual is welcome to nominate deserving individuals as candidates for appointment.
Any Canadian may be nominated for the Order of Canada. The only exceptions are federal and provincial politicians and judges, who may not be appointed while holding office.
Non-Canadians may be considered for honorary appointments.

Updated: 2007-10-18
Important Notices
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